Fargo


To collect money for an investment, Jerry (Macy) sets a fake operation up for the kidnap of his wife, but it doesn't go according to plan.



 The Coen brothers have made a name for themselves over the past twenty years and this 1996 film, written and directed by the pair cements them into the highest class of different and brilliant filmmakers.

The unusual plot opens with "This is based on a true story" when in fact it isn't, which will set the tone for a bizarre but highly intriguing viewing, made even more strange as the plot unfolds and the direction and cinematography are established.


This whole ideology of kidnapping gives the Coen brothers a great chance to dive deep into their unknowing way of thinking, and is expressed through some wonderful artistic direction to keep the audience on the edge of their seats.

The opening scene with the police cars driving towards the camera coming straight out of the mesmerizing mist is breathtaking and the different use of shots and a diverse approach to tell the tale will always surprise you in a consistent and exciting narrative.


Macy gives an Oscar nominated performance as Jerry Lundegaard a man who wants to succeed and his belief is in two criminals who he agrees to divide his earnings with, once they have successfully kidnapped his wife. Macy's portrayal of the nervous and unlawful man makes something out of the plot, and with his personal issues, do we see a real man with real problems and a real life situation in our hands, with some perfect realism with a consistent use of colloquial language to add consistency.

As good as the performances are, it is the Coen brothers who are the stars with a consistent well written plot and some fine diverse direction to make an ultimate realistic crime drama.